You Loving Me (Session) · Erykah Badu EXPLICIT

I suppose these things happen when you are winging it. I thought it was funny. I’d previously posted a short article on how we can’t lie when we sing. Her reaction is telling.

You Loving Me (Session)
Erykah Badu


You’re loving me
And I’m driving your Benz
You’re loving me
And I’m spending your ends

You’re loving me
And I’m drinking your gin
You’re loving me
And I’m fucking your friends


You’re loving me
And I’m driving your Benz
You’re loving me
And I’m spending your ends


You’re loving me
And I’m drinking your gin
You’re loving me
And I’m fucking your friends


That’s terrible, isn’t it?

Badu’s work draws from R&B, 1970s soul, and 1980s hip hop,[1] and became associated with the neo soul subgenre in the 1990s along with artists like D’Angelo.[7] For her musical sensibilities, she has often been compared[8] to jazz great Billie Holiday.[9][10] Badu’s has been described as an experimental R&B singer,[124][125] and her work explores contemporary forms of soul and hip hopMama’s Gun is a neo soul album, that incorporates funksoul, and jazz styles.[126] The album has been viewed by critics as a female companion to neo soul artist D’Angelo‘s second album Voodoo (2000), which features a similar musical style and direction.[127][128][129] Worldwide Underground followed in the same vein as Badu’s previous efforts: the album is neo-soul and prominently incorporates hip hop and funk elements, while also featuring an unconventional musical structure. New Amerykah Part One has a dense[130] stylistic amalgam that primarily incorporates funksoul, and hip hop genres,[47][131][132] as well as jazz and electronica.[133] In contrast to its predecessor, New Amerykah Part One (2008), which was digitally produced and political in tone, New Amerykah Part Two (Return of the Ankh) incorporates sampling and live instrumentation.[134][135]

Erykah Badu 2008.07.14 001.jpg

The majority of Badu’s music is greatly influenced by her beliefs of the Nation of Gods and Earths and her exploration of her African heritage.[136] The songs in her album Baduizm express her personal take on life. Her philosophy is influenced by African ideology, African-centered and Five Percent theologies, and Southern African-American folk traditions. Mama’s Gun has an confessional lyrical theme, covering themes of insecurity, social issues, and personal relationships. Worldwide Underground contains minimalist songwriting concerning hip hop culture, love, ghetto life, and gang culture.[137][138][139][140] New Amerykah Part One is an esoteric concept album with sociopolitical themes and mostly downbeat subject matter,[141][142] featuring more impersonal topics and social commentary than on Badu’s previous work.[50] Its subject matter deals with social concerns and struggles within the African-American community, exploring topics such as institutional racism, religion, poverty, urban violence, the abuse of power, complacency, cultural identity, drug addiction, and nihilism.[143][144] Badu has said that the album discusses “religion, […] poor families, the undermining of the working class, the so-called minority”,[145] Lyrically, New Amerykah Part Two is more personal than its predecessor, focusing on themes of romance and relationships.[134][135] Badu has described its sound as “very analog”.[146]

During Badu’s childhood and school years, she drew influences from a variety of hip-hop artists including Kool HercKool DJ Red AlertDJ Jazzy JeffDJ Spinderella and Salt ‘n’ Pepa; expanding on this she noted the previous rappers as being “very inspiring to me, because they were the people who conducted feelings”.[147] Badu is inspired by “stimulating” experiences. She was also influenced greatly by her music teacher Ms. Goodman,[148] who encouraged her to take up music.[148] Badu also takes influence from her grandmother and her religious views which Erykah described as a lesson saying “When you do it, it gotta be real, or that’s not it.”[148] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erykah_Badu

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