Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) Official Trailer – Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton

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Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a play by Edward Albee first staged in 1962. It examines the complexities of the marriage of a middle-aged couple, Martha and George. Late one evening after a university faculty party, they receive an unwitting younger couple, Nick and Honey, as guests and draw them into their bitter and frustrated relationship.

The play is in three acts, normally taking a little less than three hours to perform, with two 10-minute intermissions. The title is a pun on the song “Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf?” from Walt Disney‘s Three Little Pigs (1933), substituting the name of the celebrated English author Virginia Woolf. Martha and George repeatedly sing this version of the song throughout the play.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? won both the 1963 Tony Award for Best Play and the 1962–63 New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play. It is frequently revived on the modern stage. The film adaptation was released in 1966, written by Ernest Lehman, directed by Mike Nichols, and starring Richard BurtonElizabeth TaylorGeorge Segal and Sandy Dennis.

All four major actors were nominated for Academy Awards: Taylor and Burton for Best Actress and Actor and Dennis and Segal for Supporting Oscars. Both actresses won – Elizabeth Taylor won the Oscar for Best Actress but Richard Burton was passed over that year in favor of Paul Scofield in A Man For All Seasons. Sandy Dennis won the Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role.

Jack Valenti identified the film as the first controversial movie he had to deal with as president of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). The movie was the first to use the word “screw” and the phrase “hump the hostess” on screen. As he said, “In company with the MPAA’s general counsel, Louis Nizer, I met with Jack Warner, the legendary chieftain of Warner Bros., and his top aide, Ben Kalmenson. We talked for three hours, and the result was deletion of ‘screw’ and retention of ‘hump the hostess’, but I was uneasy over the meeting.”[29] Wiki

Elizabeth Taylor – What A Dump

Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf Dance Scene

Liz Taylor – Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf – HD Tribute (1966 – Richard Burton, Mike Nichols)

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf – “You certainly are a flop in some departments”

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
1962 Broadway poster
Written byEdward Albee
CharactersMartha
George
Nick
Honey
Date premieredOctober 13, 1962
Place premieredBilly Rose Theatre
Original languageEnglish
SubjectMarital strife
GenreDrama
SettingMartha and George’s New England home
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who%27s_Afraid_of_Virginia_Woolf%3F

Elizabeth Taylor: Her Search for Love (Jerry Skinner Documentary)

Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor DBE was a British-American actress, businesswoman, and humanitarian. She began her career as a child actress in the early 1940s, and was one of the most popular stars of classical Hollywood cinema in the 1950s. Wikipedia

Richard Burton

Richard BurtonCBE (/ˈbɜːrtən/; born Richard Walter Jenkins Jr.; 10 November 1925 – 5 August 1984) was a Welsh actor.[1] Noted for his mellifluous baritone voice,[2][3] Burton established himself as a formidable Shakespearean actor in the 1950s, and he gave a memorable performance of Hamlet in 1964. He was called “the natural successor to Olivier” by critic and dramaturge Kenneth Tynan. An alcoholic,[3] Burton’s failure to live up to those expectations[4] disappointed critics and colleagues and fuelled his legend as a great thespian wastrel.[3][5]

Burton was nominated for an Academy Award seven times, but never won an Oscar. He was a recipient of BAFTAsGolden Globes, and Tony Awards for Best Actor. In the mid-1960s, Burton ascended into the ranks of the top box office stars.[6] By the late 1960s, Burton was one of the highest-paid actors in the world, receiving fees of $1 million or more plus a share of the gross receipts.[7] Burton remained closely associated in the public consciousness with his second wife, actress Elizabeth Taylor. The couple’s turbulent relationship was rarely out of the news.[8] Wiki

Edward Albee

Edward Franklin Albee III (/ˈɔːlbiː/ AWL-bee; March 12, 1928 – September 16, 2016) was an American playwright known for works such as The Zoo Story (1958), The Sandbox (1959), Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962), A Delicate Balance (1966), and Three Tall Women (1994). Some critics have argued that some of his work constitutes an American variant of what Martin Esslin identified and named the Theater of the Absurd.[1] Three of his plays won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, and two of his other works won the Tony Award for Best Play.

His works are often considered as frank examinations of the modern condition. His early works reflect a mastery and Americanization of the Theatre of the Absurd that found its peak in works by European playwrights such as Samuel BeckettEugène Ionesco, and Jean Genet.

His middle period comprised plays that explored the psychology of maturing, marriage, and sexual relationships. Younger American playwrights, such as Paula Vogel, credit Albee’s daring mix of theatricality and biting dialogue with helping to reinvent the post-war American theatre in the early 1960s. Later in his life, Albee continued to experiment in works such as The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (2002). Wiki

Produced by: Eugenio Zorrilla

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