John Wayne & Marlene Dietrich in The Spoilers-1942

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John Wayne and Randolph Scott duke it out for Marlene Dietrich’s love in this riotous Western set in an Alaskan boomtown. When ship captain Roy Glennister (John Wayne) finds out he’s been duped out of a mine claim by the smooth-talking Alexander McNamara (Randolph Scott), he turns to a sassy saloon singer named Cherry Malotte (Marlene Dietrich) for help in stopping the land-grabbing thug. But revenge soon turns to romance as Cherry and Roy discover sparks in the cold frontier boomtown. When McNamara makes a pass of his own, it’s all out war as the quips — and furniture — go flying in this hilarious and hard-hitting adventure.

The Spoilers (1942) – Trailer

Marie Dietrich German soprano, see Marie Dietrich (soprano).

Marie Magdalene “Marlene” Dietrich (/mɑːrˈleɪnə ˈdiːtrɪk/, German: [maʁˈleːnə ˈdiːtʁɪç]; 27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992)[1] was a German-American[2][3][4] actress and singer. Throughout her long career, which spanned from the 1910s to the 1980s, she continually reinvented herself.[5]

Marlene Dietrich sings ‘Awake in a Dream’ From ‘Desire’ (1936)

In 1920s Berlin, Dietrich acted on the stage and in silent films. Her performance as Lola-Lola in The Blue Angel (1930) brought her international acclaim and a contract with Paramount Pictures. Dietrich starred in Hollywood films such as Morocco (1930), Shanghai Express (1932), and Desire (1936). She successfully traded on her glamorous persona and “exotic” looks, and became one of the highest-paid actresses of the era. Throughout World War II, she was a high-profile entertainer in the United States. Although she still made occasional films after the war like Witness for the Prosecution (1957), Dietrich spent most of the 1950s to the 1970s touring the world as a marquee live-show performer.

Blue Angel

Dietrich was known for her humanitarian efforts during the war, housing German and French exiles, providing financial support and even advocating their U.S. citizenship. For her work on improving morale on the front lines during the war, she received several honors from the United States, France, Belgium, and Israel. In 1999, the American Film Institute named Dietrich the ninth greatest female star of classic Hollywood cinema.[6] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marlene_Dietrich

Marion Mitchell Morrison[a] (born Marion Robert Morrison;[4] May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), known professionally as John Wayne and nicknamed Duke, was an American actor, filmmaker, and Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient.[5][6] He was among the top box office draws for three decades.[7][8]

A government agent (John Wayne) and a newsman’s daughter (Ann Rutherford) make voting safe in the Wyoming territory.

Wayne was born in Winterset, Iowa but grew up in Southern California. He lost a football scholarship to the University of Southern California as a result of a bodysurfing accident,[3]:63–64 and began working for the Fox Film Corporation. He appeared mostly in small parts, but his first leading role came in Raoul Walsh‘s Western The Big Trail (1930), an early widescreen film epic which was a box-office failure. Leading roles followed in numerous B movies during the 1930s, most of them also Westerns, without becoming a major name. It was John Ford‘s Stagecoach (1939) that made him an instant mainstream star, and he starred in 142 motion pictures altogether. According to one biographer, “John Wayne personified for millions the nation’s frontier heritage.”[9]

Wayne’s other roles in Westerns include a cattleman driving his herd on the Chisholm Trail in Red River (1948), a Civil War veteran whose niece is abducted by a tribe of Comanches in The Searchers (1956), a troubled rancher competing with a lawyer (James Stewart) for a woman’s hand in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962), and a cantankerous one-eyed marshal in True Grit (1969), for which he received the Academy Award for Best Actor. He is also remembered for his roles in The Quiet Man (1952), Rio Bravo (1959) with Dean Martin, and The Longest Day (1962). In his final screen performance, he starred as an aging gunfighter battling cancer in The Shootist (1976). He appeared with many important Hollywood stars of his era, and made his last public appearance at the Academy Awards ceremony on April 9, 1979.[10][11][12] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wayne

George Randolph Scott (January 23, 1898 – March 2, 1987) was an American film actor whose career spanned the years from 1928 to 1962. As a leading man for all but the first three years of his cinematic career, Scott appeared in a variety of genres, including social dramas, crime dramas, comediesmusicals (albeit in non-singing and non-dancing roles), adventure tales, war films, and a few horror and fantasy films. However, his most enduring image is that of the tall-in-the-saddle Western hero. Out of his more than 100 film appearances over 60 were in Westerns; thus, “of all the major stars whose name was associated with the Western, Scott most closely identified with it.”[1]

Scott’s more than 30 years as a motion picture actor resulted in his working with many acclaimed screen directors, including Henry KingRouben MamoulianMichael CurtizJohn CromwellKing VidorAllan DwanFritz LangSam PeckinpahHenry Hathaway (eight times), Ray Enright (seven), Edwin L. Marin (seven), Andre DeToth (six), and most notably, his seven film collaborations with Budd Boetticher. Scott also worked with a diverse array of cinematic leading ladies, from Shirley Temple and Irene Dunne to Mae West and Marlene Dietrich.

Tall (6 ft 2½ in; 189 cm), lanky and handsome, Scott displayed an easygoing charm and courtly Southern drawl in his early films that helped offset his limitations as an actor, where he was frequently found to be stiff or “lumbering”.[2] As he matured, however, Scott’s acting improved while his features became burnished and leathery, turning him into the ideal “strong, silent” type of stoic hero. The BFI Companion to the Western noted:

In his earlier Westerns … the Scott persona is debonair, easy-going, graceful, though with the necessary hint of steel. As he matures into his fifties his roles change. Increasingly Scott becomes the man who has seen it all, who has suffered pain, loss, and hardship, and who has now achieved (but at what cost?) a stoic calm proof against vicissitude.[1]

During the early 1950s, Scott was a consistent box-office draw. In the annual Motion Picture Herald Top Ten Polls, he ranked 10th in 1950, seventh in 1951, and 10th in both 1952 and 1953.[3] Scott also appeared in the Quigley’s Top Ten Money Makers Poll from 1950 to 1953.[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randolph_Scott

Author/Editor: Eugenio Zorrilla.

Corsten's Countdown 650

In Corsten’s Countdown episode 650 I have new music for you from Grum, Andy Moor & Somna featuring Blu Eyes, a collab from Markus Schulz & Talla 2XLC, an exclusive new Tom Exo track and much more! Are you ready??? BIG show!

Tracklist:

Gabriel & Dresden 'Keep On Holding' (ilan Bluestone & Maor Levi Remix) (ilan Bluestone at ABGT350)


The moment ilan Bluestone brought on stage fellow remixer Maor Levi & (one half of) original producer’s Gabriel & Dresden whilst ilan & Maor’s ‘Keep On Holding’ remix filled the O2 Arena Prague during ilan’s ABGT350 performance.

Buy/stream: https://anjunabeats.ffm.to/kohr.oyd Pre-order Gabriel & Dresden ‘Remedy’: https://Anjunabeats.lnk.to/REMEDYYo Anjunabeats New Releases on Spotify: https://Anjunabeats.lnk.to/NewRelease…

Watch ilan Bluestone’s full ABGT350 set: https://youtu.be/58Rx8gVwJlc Watch A&B’s ABGT350 set: https://youtu.be/XlndmZ-4mc8 Watch Gabriel & Dresden at ABGT350: https://youtu.be/BhonjxXLl2w Watch Genix at

ABGT350: https://youtu.be/qlD6pzWmrrg Watch Qrion at ABGT350: https://youtu.be/DOyxDNHJWj0 Watch Spencer Brown at ABGT350: https://youtu.be/8Mb1dsthisc Watch Tinlicker at ABGT350: https://youtu.be/UzbXJd0r7dY

Sweet Smell of Success (4/11) Movie CLIP – The Clean Columnist (1957) HD

CLIP DESCRIPTION: Sidney (Tony Curtis) attempts to blackmail columnist Leo Bartha (Lawrence Dobkin) by disclosing his relationship with Rita (Barbara Nichols) to Leo’s wife (Lurene Tuttle) in order for him to print a smear on Steve Dallas (Martin Miner).

FILM DESCRIPTION:
Ernest Lehman drew upon his experiences as a Broadway press agent to write the devastating a clef short story “Tell Me About Tomorrow.” This in turn was adapted by Lehman and Clifford Odets into the sharp-edged, penetrating feature film Sweet Smell of Success. Burt Lancaster stars as J. J. Hunsecker, a Walter Winchell-style columnist who wields his power like a club, steamrolling friends and enemies alike. Tony Curtis co-stars as Sidney Falco, a sycophantic press agent who’d sell his grandmother to get an item into Hunsecker’s popular newspaper column. Hunsecker enlists Falco’s aid in ruining the reputation of jazz guitarist Steve Dallas (Martin Milner), who has had the temerity to court Hunsecker’s sister Susan (Susan Harrison). Falco contrives to plant marijuana on Dallas, then summons corrupt, sadistic NYPD officer Harry Kello (Emile Meyer), who owes Hunsecker several favors, to arrest the innocent singer. The real Walter Winchell, no longer as powerful as he’d been in the 1940s but still a man to be reckoned with, went after Ernest Lehman with both barrels upon the release of Sweet Smell of Success. Winchell was not so much offended by the unflattering portrait of himself as by the dredging up of an unpleasant domestic incident from his past. While Success was not a success at the box office, it is now regarded as a model of street-smart cinematic cynicism. The electric performances of the stars are matched by the taut direction of Alex MacKendrick, the driving jazz score of Elmer Bernstein, and the evocative nocturnal camerawork of James Wong Howe.

CREDITS:
TM & © MGM (1957)
Cast: Tony Curtis, Burt Lancaster
Director: Alexander Mackendrick
Producers: Tony Curtis, Harold Hecht, Burt Lancaster, James Hill
Screenwriters: Ernest Lehman, Alexander Mackendrick, Clifford Odets

Mark Knight & Adrian Hour – Transitions (Original Mix)

Hot on the heels of the mammoth ‘Dance On My Heart’ release that landed on Toolroom last Month, Mark Knight & Adrian Hour lock horns for the final time in 2015 for what can only be described as a huge club EP.

In this package you’ll find ‘Chaos Theory’, ‘Freak Out’ and ‘Transitions’. All 3 are tried & tested dance floor destroyers that need no fancy write up’s. Just hit download, press play and watch the dance floors erupt!

TRX038 – Exclusive to Beatport


Subscribe here – http://bit.ly/subscribe2Toolroom http://www.toolroomrecords.com http://www.beatport.com/label/toolroo… https://www.facebook.com/toolroomrecords https://twitter.com/toolroomrecords https://www.beatport.com/track/transition-extended-mix/12803060

Soapdish (3/10) Movie CLIP – Death of a Salesman (1991) HD

CLIP DESCRIPTION:
David (Robert Downey Jr.) travels to Florida to recruit Jeffrey (Kevin Kline), a washed up TV actor with a gig performing dinner theater for senior citizens.

FILM DESCRIPTION:
In the comedic farce Soapdish, the behind-the-scenes lives of several soap opera actors are just as melodramatic as those of their television counterparts. Sally Field stars as Celeste Talbert, the star of a declining TV show. To make matters worse, Talbert’s career is thrown into turmoil when her rival, Montana Moorehead (Cathy Moriarty), tries to persuade producer David Barnes (Robert Downey Jr.) to write Talbert off the show. Smitten by Moorehead, Barnes comes up with a scheme to get Talbert off the show by hiring her niece Lori (Elisabeth Shue) and then Jeffrey (Kevin Kline), an old flame and cast member who was written out of the show 20 years prior. Soon, mayhem rules on the set as the cast and crew tangle, culminating in a special episode, broadcast live.

CREDITS:
TM & © Paramount (1991)
Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Kevin Kline, Phil Leeds
Director: Michael Hoffman
Producers: Joel Freeman, Alan Greisman, Herbert Ross, Aaron Spelling, Victoria White
Screenwriters: Robert Harling, Andrew Bergman