Santana ft. Michelle Branch – The Game Of Love Official Music Video

2013–present: Reunion of the classic line-up, CorazónSantana IV, and Africa Speaks[edit]

On 2 February 2013, Carlos Santana confirmed that he would reunite his classic line-up, most of whom played Woodstock with him in 1969. Santana stated that he is reuniting the group with the intention of recording new music. Confirmed for the reunion are Neal Schon, who was in the band in the early 1970s where he traded lead guitar work with Santana before leaving with founding Santana singer-organist Gregg Rolie in 1973 to form Journey; drummer Mike Shrieve and percussionist Mike Carabello. Santana said of Rolie, who played with Ringo Starr’s All-Starr Band for the last two years, “I’m pretty sure Gregg’s going to do it.” In February 2013, Rolie told Radio.com, “it’s (the reunion) just a matter of putting it together and going and doing it. I would do it. I think it’s a great idea. People would love it. It could be great!”[13]

In the meantime, Santana released on 6 May 2014 a new studio album entitled Corazón and on 9 September 2014, Corazón – Live from Mexico: Live It to Believe It, a new live album (on CD, DVD and Blu-ray) of their show in 14 December 2013 in Guadalajara, Mexico.[14]

On 15 April 2016, Santana released Santana IV, the wildly anticipated studio album that reunites the early 1970s classic lineup of Carlos Santana (guitar, vocals), Gregg Rolie (keyboards, lead vocals), Neal Schon (guitar, vocals), Michael Carabello (percussion) and Michael Shrieve (drums). The album marks the first time in 45 years – since 1971’s multi-platinum classic Santana III – that the quintet has recorded together.[15]

The origins for the reunion go back several years, when Schon suggested that he and Carlos Santana record together. Santana liked the idea but went one better, proposing that they recruit Rolie, Shrieve and Carabello for what would be called “Santana IV”. After initial writing sessions and rehearsals took place in 2013, the group recorded throughout 2014 and 2015, amassing 16 new tracks that combined all their signature elements – Afro-Latin rhythms, soaring vocals, electrifying blues-psychedelic guitar solos, and irrepressible jubilant percussion work.

About the “Santana IV” team, Santana stated: “It was magical, we didn’t have to try to force the vibe – it was immense. From there, we then needed to come up with a balance of songs and jams that people would immediately identify as Santana.”[16]

Santana IV features 16 all-new tracks written and produced by the band. Joining the core “Santana IV” band in the studio are current Santana members Karl Perazzo (percussion) and Benny Rietveld (bass), with vocalist Ronald Isley guesting on two cuts.

The first single from Santana IV, entitled “Anywhere You Want to Go”, was released on 5 February 2016.[17]

On 21 October 2016, Santana released Santana IV: Live at the House of Blues Las Vegas on Eagle Rock Entertainment, a new (151 minutes) live album (on DVD/Blu-ray/2CD) of their concert on 21 March 2016 at the House of Blues, Las VegasNevada.

In early January 2019, Santana signed with Concord Records[18] and on 25 January, they released In Search of Mona Lisa, a new (5-track) EP.[19] The day before, they also released a video for new single, “Do You Remember Me.”[20] In March 2019, the band announced plans to release on June 7, 2019, Africa Speaks, their new full-length album produced by Rick Rubin.[21][22]

2019 marks the 20th anniversary of Carlos Santana’s iconic album, Supernatural, and the 50th anniversary of his legendary performance at Woodstock. Santana is currently headlining a multi-year residency at House of Blues at Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. The band is set to headline at both Woodstock 50[23] and Bethel Woods’ half-centennial celebration in Bethel, NY, in August 2019.[24] Prior and before, the band is touring in support of the new album, from April to November 2019.[25] Wiki.

The Modern Jazz Quartet – Angel Eyes

On a slightly different tack, the Modern Jazz Quartet (made up of John Lewis, piano; Milt Jackson, vibraphone; Percy Heath, bass; and Kenny Clarke, soon replaced by Connie Kay, drums) was formed in 1953. After his years with Gillespie, Lewis had been inspired further by his study of classical music, especially the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Thus, Lewis brought a new kind of compositional (often contrapuntal) integration to the group’s repertory, particularly in fugal or quasi-fugal pieces, such as the early “Vendome” or the later “Three Windows” and the album-length work “The Comedy.” Above all, in these performances Lewis sought to bring collective improvisation back from earlier times; many striking examples can be heard on the recordings made by the Modern Jazz Quartet over a period of 20 years, especially in the frequent, remarkable same-register duets of Lewis and Jackson.

https://www.britannica.com/art/jazz/Jazz-at-the-crossroads#ref395994

Modern Jazz Quartet – Blues In C Minor

Percy Leroy Heath, American musician (born April 30, 1923, Wilmington, N.C.—died April 28, 2005, Southampton, N.Y.), became renowned for his melodic bass playing in the Modern Jazz Quartet(MJQ), one of the longest-lived of all jazz groups, and in the popular Heath Brothers combos. During World War II he was a fighter pilot with the Army Air Forces’ Tuskegee Airmen; after the war he gradually became noted as one of the outstanding bassists in the then-new bop idiom. The MJQ’s elegant ensemble sound and far-reaching repertoire offered uncommonly wide latitude for his buoyant, swinging accompaniments and lyric soloing; he played steadily with the group from 1952 to its disbanding in 1997. During the MJQ’s 1974–81 hiatus, he also began playing cello, as well as bass, with his brothers—Jimmy on saxophone and Albert (“Tootie”) on drums. He played in the Heath Brothers for the rest of his life. He also was bassist on classic recordings by Thelonious MonkMiles Davis, and Ornette Coleman.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Percy-Heath

Modern Jazz Quartet – Summertime

Modern Jazz Quartet

AMERICAN MUSIC GROUPWRITTEN BY: 

See Article HistoryAlternative Title: MJQ

Modern Jazz Quartet (MJQ), American musical ensemble noted for delicate percussion sonorities, innovations in jazz forms, and consistently high performance standards sustained over a long career. For most of its existence it was composed of Milt Jackson, vibes; John Lewis, piano; Percy Heath, bass; and Connie Kay, drums.READ MORE ON THIS TOPICjazz: Chamber jazz and the Modern Jazz QuartetPerhaps in reaction to the hot, more strident, more frenetic expressions of the postwar bands, or perhaps as a direct influence of the Thornhill-Evans…

Jackson, Lewis, and drummer Kenny Clarke were pioneer bop musicians who had played together in the 1948 Dizzy Gillespie big band and pursued separate careers before adding Heath to form the Modern Jazz Quartet in 1952. Its early career was distinguished by introducing Lewis compositionssuch as “Django” and “Concorde.” Clarke’s departure in 1955 resulted in a loss of some of the group’s rhythmic energy; his replacement was Kay, whose playing helped place the interplay of Jackson and Lewis in the foreground. Jackson, whose dynamic sensitivity and technical mastery brought a rare expressive quality to his instrument, was a virtuoso of melody, rhythmic detail, and swing. Lewis accompanied him not with the customary harmonic punctuations but rather with riffs (repeated melodic patterns) and melodic variations in a rhythmically simplified style that resulted in unique extended counterpoint; Heath, an uncommonly melodic bassist, and Kay accompanied.

John (Aaron) Lewis with the Modern Jazz Quartet.
John (Aaron) Lewis with the Modern Jazz Quartet.Frank Driggs Collection

Lewis’s interest in baroque forms led him to compose fugues for the MJQ, and his classical-music-inspired works such as The Comedy (1962) and the film score No Sun in Venice (1957) are among the group’s successes. Popular and jazz standards and Jackson songs were also part of its repertoire; in the 1980s it played, less successfully, arrangements of Duke Ellington compositions. In its album Third Stream Music (1957) the MJQ is joined by a string quartet and others in extended works by jazz and classical composers.

The Modern Jazz Quartet.
The Modern Jazz Quartet.Prestige Records

Its members also pursued separate careers during periods when the MJQ was not performing together, and in 1974 it disbanded. It began reuniting for annual tours in the 1980s. Following Kay’s death in 1994, Albert (“Tootie”) Heath, brother of Percy, became the MJQ’s drummer.Facts Matter. Support the truth and unlock all of Britannica’s content.

https://www.britannica.com/topic/Modern-Jazz-Quartet

Frank Sinatra – Come Fly With Me

Francis Albert Sinatra was an American singer, actor and producer who was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century. He is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold more than 150 million records worldwide. Wikipedia

Frank Sinatra – Strangers in the Night

Born to Italian immigrants in Hoboken, New Jersey, Sinatra began his musical career in the swing era with bandleaders Harry James and Tommy Dorsey. Sinatra found success as a solo artist after he signed with Columbia Records in 1943, becoming the idol of the “bobby soxers“. He released his debut album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra, in 1946. Sinatra’s professional career had stalled by the early 1950s, and he turned to Las Vegas, where he became one of its best known residency performers as part of the Rat Pack. His career was reborn in 1953 with the success of From Here to Eternity, with his performance subsequently winning an Academy Award and Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor. Sinatra released several critically lauded albums, including In the Wee Small Hours (1955), Songs for Swingin’ Lovers! (1956), Come Fly with Me (1958), Only the Lonely (1958) and Nice ‘n’ Easy (1960).