Am I Ugly? – Define Beauty – Marie Schfuller

Define Beauty

For her contribution to the latest series of Define Beauty, London-based director Marie Schfuller has turned to the dark depths of the web, holding up a mirror to strange cultural occurrences that have become the everyday. In a new film, Am I Ugly?, the filmmaker highlights the pressure placed on young girls and women to meet an unrealistic and unvaried standard of beauty. Read more on NOWNESS – http://bit.ly/2dsGo65

When my dog was on a diet, it ate a lot of carrots. I wonder if it had the same dreams.


Leonard Weisgard (1916–2000): illustration from “The Funny Bunny Factory” by Adam Green, Grosset and Dunlap, 1950.

When my dog was on a diet, it ate a lot of carrots. I wonder if it had the same dreams.

This article first appeared here.

‎Illustration: Leonard Weisgard (1916–2000): illustration from “The Funny Bunny Factory” by Adam Green, Grosset and Dunlap, 1950.

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/56751239_1770018919765341_8004823320295899136_o.jpg?_nc_cat=109&efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&_nc_ht=scontent-sea1-1.xx&oh=ea6db7cfe30ac33e292660fe270ed95e&oe=5D027F42

BLACKENED SEASONING BLEND- Ideal for chicken and fish, pork and beef!

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Blackening is a cooking technique used in the preparation of fish and other foods. Often associated with Cajun cuisine, this technique was popularized by chef Paul Prudhomme.[1] The food is dipped in melted butter and then dredged in a mixture of herbs and spices, usually some combination of thymeoreganochili pepperpeppercornssaltgarlic powder and onion powder.[2] It is then cooked in a very hot cast-iron skillet.[2][3] The characteristic brown-black color of the crust results from a combination of browned milk solids from the butter and charred spices.[4]

While the original recipe calls for redfish,[3] the same method of preparation can be applied to other types of fish and other protein sources, such as steak or chicken cutlets.

INGREDIENTS

 

Cajun-Blackening-Seasoning-Recipe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blackening_(cooking)

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/paul-prudhommes-blackened-seasoning-blend-183866

An Analog Guy In A Digital World. “A night with the piano & me after listening to some genius Nils Frahm…” (Martin Roth)

 

Martin Roth

The Frankfurt born, Berlin based DJ & Producer Martin Roth first arrived in the spotlight of global underground dance music when alongside Eric Prydz and Deadmau5 he was named a Beatport Star of 2009 as a result of topping their sales chart no less than 5 times that year, achieving an incredible 16 Top 10 positions and receiving 3 nominations at the Beatport Annual Awards for his productions and remixes.

Since those heady days Martin has gone from strength to strength cementing his reputation as one of the brightest stars of the underground dance scene.

Influenced by both the classic progressive house sound of the 90’s & 00’s and the deep house avant garde of today, Martin’s tracks and remixes have been continually supported by the likes of Sasha, John Digweed, Eric Prydz, Tiefschwartz, Solomun, Climbers, Jozif amongst many other leading names.

2012’s “Beautiful Life” released on Anjunadeep Records became one of the biggest deep house records of the year achieving a top 5 Beatport chart position and racking up an incredible 3 million plus views on YouTube.

The follow up “Make Love To You Baby”, again on Anjunadeep, reinforced Martin’s position as a stalwart of the trippier shade of deep house and found favour with many of the major players in the scene.

As a classically trained pianist Martin is very at home in the studio making music and he has a number of his deep and textured grooves getting ready for release in 2013 as well as the launch of a new production project exploring the techno sounds he has always loved.

Equally as natural and instinctive on the decks as he is in the studio, Martin has built a strong career as a DJ and amongst appearing regularly at the best clubs on every continent he holds down a residency at the legendary Ministry of Sound in London.

 

 

 

 

The capacity to imagine nonexistent things was the key to everything, for it allowed them to communicate better

“In his book Sapiens, historian Yuval Harari posits that our ancestors’ capacity to imagine nonexistent things was the key to everything, for it allowed them to communicate better. Before this change, they could only trust people from their immediate family or tribe. Afterward their trust extended to larger communities, bound by common fantasies (for example, belief in invisible yet imaginable deities, in the afterlife, and in the divinity of the leader) and expectations.”

 

I was replying to a post on the web, and when I read the word primitive, this jumped mind. It is interesting to read how we evolved to trust each other further than we can trow a rock.  How we placed confidence on those who shared our ideas, ideals, values and hopes.

 

This article first appeared here, based on:

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from “The Book of Why: The New Science of Cause and Effect” by Judea Pearl, Dana Mackenzie

Chicken Breasts With Tomatoes and Capers

 

Boneless chicken breasts are a staple for any time-pressed cook’s kitchen because they’re quicker to cook than bone-in chicken breasts.

Chicken breasts are susceptible to drying out, so they’re best cooked quickly using high heat. That means skillet-cooking, stir-frying, roasting, or grilling chicken breasts are the best routes. Skillet-cooking is particularly easy because you can make a sauce in the same pan.

How to Saute (Skillet-Cook) Chicken Breasts

Chicken, Asparagus, and Bacon Skillet

It’s best to choose a quick method that won’t dry them out. We fried this chicken with asparagus and bacon in a skillet.

When it comes to cooking boneless chicken breasts, the terms “saute,” “pan-fry,” and “skillet-cook” all refer to the same basic preparation: Cooking chicken breasts in a skillet in a small amount of fat (such as cooking oil, olive oil, or butter) or in a skillet sprayed with nonstick cooking spray.

  1. Select a heavy skillet that can accommodate the chicken breasts in one layer. If the skillet is too large, pan juices can burn; if the skillet is too small, the overcrowded chicken will steam instead of brown.
  2. If a chicken breast is significantly thicker in some parts than others, consider pounding it with a meat mallet to even it out.
  3. Sprinkle both sides of the chicken with salt and ground black pepper to taste.
  4. If the skillet is not nonstick, lightly coat it with nonstick cooking spray or 2 to 3 teaspoons cooking oil.
  5. Preheat the skillet over medium-high heat until hot.
  6. Place the chicken in the skillet. Do not add any liquid and do not cover the skillet.
  7. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the meat is no longer pink and the juices run clear. This should take 8 to 12 minutes. As the chicken cooks, turn it occasionally so it browns evenly. If the poultry browns too quickly, reduce the heat to medium-low.
  8. Chicken breasts are done when the meat is no longer pink and the juices run clear (170 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer). Try not to overcook chicken breasts, as the meat can become stringy and dry.

How to Broil Chicken Breaststumblr_md22to6fHF1qdei8m

  1. Brush your chicken with oil or seasoning, or try out a chicken breast marinade before broiling. Marinating prevents the chicken breasts from drying out. You can also remove the pan before the last few minutes of broiling, brush with a sauce, and continue cooking. For broiled BBQ chicken breasts, brush with barbecue sauce.
  2. Preheat the broiler, then insert the pan so the chicken breasts are 4 to 5 inches from the heat.
  3. Broil 4- to 5-ounce boneless, skinless chicken breasts 12 to 15 minutes, turning over about halfway through the cooking time and brushing with sauce or seasoning if desired.
  4. Remove chicken when it reaches 170 degrees F and is no longer pink

 

  • YIELD 4 servings
  • TIME 20 minutes

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts(about 2 1/4 pounds)
  •  Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 6 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic
  • 4 teaspoons finely chopped fresh tarragon, or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon
  • 8 ripe plum tomatoes cut into small cubes (or one 28-ounce can of tomatoes, drained and chopped)
  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup drained capers
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley leaves

 

PREPARATION

  1. Sprinkle the chicken with salt and pepper. Heat the oil and butter in a heavy-bottom skillet. Add the chicken breasts and saute over medium-high heat, turning the pieces often until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the shallots and garlic around the chicken. Cook briefly; add the tarragon, tomatoes, vinegar, capers, wine and tomato paste. Stir to dissolve the brown particles adhering to the bottom of the skillet.
  3. Blend well, bring to a boil, and then cover and simmer for 9 minutes. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

 

 

 

 

Jim Wilson/The New York Times

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/4406-chicken-breasts-with-tomatoes-and-capers