Santana – Oye Como Va (Audio)

1967–1972: Formation and peak years[edit]

The band was formed in 1966 in San Francisco as the Santana Blues Band with the help of guitarist Tom Fraser.[11] The first established members were Carlos Santana (lead guitar), Marcus Malone (percussion), Rod Harper (drums), Sergio “Gus” Rodriguez (bass guitar) and Gregg Rolie (lead vocalsHammond organ B3). The group’s first audition with this line up was at the Avalon Ballroom in the late summer of 1967. After the audition, Chet Helms (the promoter of the event), in concert with the Family Dog, told the band that they would never make it in the San Francisco Music Scene playing Latin fusion and suggested Carlos keep his day job washing dishes at Tick Tock’s Drive-In on 3rd Street. By the time Santana began work on its debut album Santana, Malone had already left the band as he had been convicted of manslaughter and had started serving his sentence in Marin County‘s San Quentin State Prison.

Ahead of Woodstock, Bill Graham was asked to help with logistics and planning. Graham agreed to lend his help only if a new band he was championing, an unknown band called Santana, was added to the bill. Santana was announced as one of the performers at the Woodstock Festival. The band started recording their 1969 debut album Santana in May 1969 and finished it in a month. Wiki

Natalie Cole – Route 66

In the early 1980s Cole’s career stalled because of drug problems and a serious throat ailment. She eventually overcame her difficulties, and by the end of the decade she had begun singing more jazz-inspired pop. Her comeback was completed in 1991 with the release of Unforgettable with Love, a double album that featured her father’s classics, including “Smile,” “The Very Thought of You,” and “Mona Lisa.” A commercial and critical success, it was Cole’s first album to reach number one and earned three Grammy Awards. The title track was digitally engineered to simulate a father-and-daughter duet. Later albums include Take a Look (1993), Snowfall on the Sahara (1999), and Ask a Woman Who Knows (2002). She returned to her father’s songbook for Still Unforgettable (2008), a collection of romantic standards that won the Grammy Award for best traditional pop vocal album in 2009. In 2000 her autobiography, Angel on My Shoulder (written with Digby Diehl), was published.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Natalie-Cole

Unforgettable (Duet with Nat King Cole)

Natalie Cole

AMERICAN SINGERWRITTEN BY: 

LAST UPDATED: May 9, 2019 See Article HistoryAlternative Title: Natalie Maria Cole

Natalie Cole, in full Natalie Maria Cole, (born February 6, 1950, Los Angeles, California, U.S.—died December 31, 2015, Los Angeles), American singer who forged a successful career performing rhythm and blues and jazz-based pop music.

The daughter of legendary crooner Nat King Cole, she earned a degree in child psychology from the University of Massachusetts in 1972. Although uncertain about pursuing a career in entertainment, she accepted a summer job singing with a band and was soon performing regularly. In 1974 she met Chuck Jackson and Marvin Yancy, songwriters and record producers who became frequent collaborators and helped her sign with Capitol Records. A string of rhythm-and-blues albums followed, beginning with her debut album, Inseparable (1975), which earned Cole two Grammy Awards, including one for best new artist. The following year Natalie was released, which went gold and received a Grammy for the hit single “Sophisticated Lady.” Her success continued with Unpredictable (1977) and Thankful (1977), both of which went platinum.

The Modern Jazz Quarter – Three Windows

Jazz meets classical and the “third stream” begins

It was also in the 1950s that a greater rapprochement between jazz and classical music began to emerge. Like Lewis, many other jazz musicians were studying much of the great classical literature, from Bach to Béla Bartók, to expand their musical horizons. Classical musicians, too, were listening more seriously to jazz and taking a professional interest in it. The ideological and technical barriers between jazz and classical music were beginning to break down. In that climate an apparently new concept or style, termed “third stream” by Gunther Schuller [Ed. note: the author of this article], arose. But third stream music was only apparently new, since European and American composers—including Claude DebussyIgor StravinskyCharles Ives (using ragtime), Darius MilhaudMaurice RavelAaron CoplandJohn Alden CarpenterKurt Weill, and many others—had employed elements of jazz since early in the century. The difference in the 1950s and ’60s was that (1) the third stream amalgams began to include improvisation and (2) the traffic was now no longer on a one-way street from classical music toward jazz but was flowing in both directions. Spearheaded by Lewis and Schuller, the movement produced a wide variety of works and varying approaches to the process of cross-fertilization. Third stream began, particularly in the cultivated hands of pianist Ran Blake, to mate classical concepts and techniques with all manner of ethnic and vernacular musics and traditions as well as with jazz.

The Modern Jazz Quartet – Angel Eyes

On a slightly different tack, the Modern Jazz Quartet (made up of John Lewis, piano; Milt Jackson, vibraphone; Percy Heath, bass; and Kenny Clarke, soon replaced by Connie Kay, drums) was formed in 1953. After his years with Gillespie, Lewis had been inspired further by his study of classical music, especially the work of Johann Sebastian Bach. Thus, Lewis brought a new kind of compositional (often contrapuntal) integration to the group’s repertory, particularly in fugal or quasi-fugal pieces, such as the early “Vendome” or the later “Three Windows” and the album-length work “The Comedy.” Above all, in these performances Lewis sought to bring collective improvisation back from earlier times; many striking examples can be heard on the recordings made by the Modern Jazz Quartet over a period of 20 years, especially in the frequent, remarkable same-register duets of Lewis and Jackson.

https://www.britannica.com/art/jazz/Jazz-at-the-crossroads#ref395994

The Modern Jazz Quartet – All The Things You Are

Chamber jazz and the Modern Jazz Quartet

Perhaps in reaction to the hot, more strident, more frenetic expressions of the postwar bands, or perhaps as a direct influence of the Thornhill-Evans approach, a cool strain entered the jazz scene in the late 1940s. Generated by Young and furthered by such reed players as Lee Konitz and Gerry Mulligancool jazz, along with its structural corollary—contrapuntal, harmonically slimmed-down (often pianoless) chamber jazz—was suddenly in. Understatement and a more relaxed expression replaced extroversion and high-tension virtuosity. Examples abound, beginning with the Miles Davis Nonet (1948–50)—a direct offspring in instrumentation and musical intent of the Thornhill band. In such pieces as “Boplicity,” “Israel,” “Move,” and “Moondreams,” fine improvised solos by Davis, Konitz, and Mulligan were meaningfully integrated into the arrangers’ scores. Various octets, nonets, and other small ensembles soon followed suit, as did such West Coast-based quartets and quintets as those led by Mulligan, Chet Baker, Shelly Manne, Shorty Rogers, Jimmy Giuffre, and Chico Hamilton.

https://www.britannica.com/art/jazz/Jazz-at-the-crossroads#ref395994

Modern Jazz Quartet – Blues In C Minor

Percy Leroy Heath, American musician (born April 30, 1923, Wilmington, N.C.—died April 28, 2005, Southampton, N.Y.), became renowned for his melodic bass playing in the Modern Jazz Quartet(MJQ), one of the longest-lived of all jazz groups, and in the popular Heath Brothers combos. During World War II he was a fighter pilot with the Army Air Forces’ Tuskegee Airmen; after the war he gradually became noted as one of the outstanding bassists in the then-new bop idiom. The MJQ’s elegant ensemble sound and far-reaching repertoire offered uncommonly wide latitude for his buoyant, swinging accompaniments and lyric soloing; he played steadily with the group from 1952 to its disbanding in 1997. During the MJQ’s 1974–81 hiatus, he also began playing cello, as well as bass, with his brothers—Jimmy on saxophone and Albert (“Tootie”) on drums. He played in the Heath Brothers for the rest of his life. He also was bassist on classic recordings by Thelonious MonkMiles Davis, and Ornette Coleman.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Percy-Heath